2016 Scholarship Winners

Vietnam War Essay
Kiiera Anderson
I am grateful to have all three of my grandfather’s as Veterans that served during
the Vietnam War, and I am also honored to be an American living in this country. I am,
however, sad to admit that I am witness to our country’s media now, as a 17 year old,
and would not have been proud during the Vietnam War either.
I’m very fortunate to be able to talk to two of my Grandfather’s about their time in
the service. It truly saddens me to hear first hand how the media not only covered the
Vietnam War, but how it changed and shaped the opinions of so many Americans.
One of my grandfathers mentioned that, “They lied about what went on there.
The papers downplayed
the war and made the soldiers out to be murderers.” I cannot
imagine coming home and feeling like the enemy in your own country. He received a
Vietnam Service of Medal with a Bronze Star and a Combat Action Ribbon, awards that
should have been received with honor and praise. My other two Grandfathers didn’t
see combat duty, but they too were blamed for the war. None of them were received in
a high regard.
The media gives quick coverage, but the type of coverage is chosen by who? I
believe that Americans and others became influenced heavily by the portrayal of war in
the media. The media altered their stories, omitted the “good” things our troops were
doing, and only shared misleading and biased information. By keeping facts away from
the people, they spread the need for peace and the war to be over by only showing the
“ugliness” that all war contains.
I can’t help but to think about how media today is playing a role in our
Presidential race. Opinions are being shaped by media propaganda, both true and
false. It is challenging to decipher between the truth and the lies that are being thrown
on TV and all over social media. Being that I am a teenager, I am exposed to this more
than any other age group.
My Grandmother’s shared as well, as they were the ones viewing the media and
how it was causing unrest in our own country. Pictures of United States casualties
flooded media. Pictures of children starving, dirty, and alone were shown to tug at the
heartstrings of America. “Photos of wounded American soldiers were a constant,”
shared my Grandmother. This caused more and more people to want the war over.
“The protesters didn’t help our soldiers at all,“ shared another Grandma. A war was
now breaking out on American soil. Protesters held signs that boycotted the war. Signs
read things like, “Bring our Boys Home,” and “Peace, Not War.”
Media has proven to be disastrous especially
in times of war. It may depend on
who you ask, but I believe the United States won the Vietnam War, it was the media
that “lost” it for us. My Grandfathers served this country proud, and I am lucky to call
them “Grandpa.”
Thank you to everyone who made this award possible, but more importantly
thank you to those who served our country those
who aren’t with us anymore and
those who are still here today. I want to give a special thank you to my grandfather’s,
I’m glad to have you in my life!

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Dear Mr. Hanson and whom it may concern,
 
Recently, I was awarded the Frank Budd Memorial Scholarship, the first of its kind given out for medical intensive students. Not only is it amazing to receive this generous donation and be given a scholarship, I was blessed to have been involved in a true Memorial Day ceremony and meet some amazing people. I would like to personally thank Laura Budd for her amazing contribution to creating the scholarship and the warmth I received from her when arriving. I want to thank people like Sue, a retired nurse anesthetist who served in Vietnam, Don and Tom, who were also veterans from the war, and Kathy; people who not only made this ceremony possible, but offered valuable insight and knowledge about their pasts. It was truly my pleasure to be a bigger part of a holiday that is often over looked by those who do not know the trials and tribulations of military families first hand. I am sure I have more people to thank and I am just forgetting to add them, so I would like to say a big giant thank you to everyone who was a part of this scholarship and ceremony.
 
Sincerely,
Connor Gray

Connor Gray

    The Vietnam War was the first major conflict to use helicopters to transport wounded quickly to medical facilities, so this event more than any other previous disputes required the use of medical professionals. My grandpa, Thomas Sample, was in the Navy during the war and stationed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, during the majority of it. Although he rarely saw nurses and doctors in action with wounded patients, he was met by hundreds of wounded soldiers on the way back to the states that had survived their ordeals thanks to these medical staff. In fact, 98% of patients wounded in action that survived the trip to the “hospital” camps survived their war injuries. Doctors were obviously in high demand and imperative to this success, but nurses were the true unsung heroes of the war. Many of these women actually joined the war to receive training and an education in hopes of pursuing a job in the medical field after the event. These individuals would be given twelve hour shifts for six days a week, but in cases of mass casualty it wasn’t unusual to have to work 24 or 36 hours straight. Beyond that, my grandpa told me, some of these people would volunteer their extra time by working at local hospitals to help civilians or teach them basic hygiene and even English. An interesting thing about nurses working during the Vietnam War was that their roles changed immensely in the field of combat. At home (the states), nurses were expected to only follow doctor’s orders all the time, but in the war many nurses were expected to make their own decisions and do a lot of what doctors were expected to do anywhere else. Their contribution during the war, and others, saved thousands of lives and created a new generation of medical professionals.

    My grandpa, who was fortunate enough to have never seen active combat or been injured, has been more affected by medical personnel during peacetime then he ever was during the war. Every Wednesday morning, my grandpa drives a group of veterans from Duluth to the VA hospital in Minneapolis. In his opinion, this is a way to continue the brotherly bonds that he feels will never disappear between the people who served in the Vietnam War. My grandpa is always amazed at the fact that many of the medical professionals he has spoken with in the cities are just as caring about our veterans as the doctors and nurses who worked during the war were. He is amazed at the leaps and bounds technology has made in hospitals, and has seen countless veterans recover from wartime injuries they had been struggling with in the 70’s. Personally, I believe that medical professionals are only as important as their patients. Being someone who wants to become a Nurse Anesthetist in the future, it would be an honor to work with someone who had served our country in uniform. The feeling of mutual respect between both doctors, nurses, and soldiers, is something that my grandpa valued equally during the Vietnam War and his retiring years in the states.

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Dear Scholarship Committee:

I want to thank you so much for this opportunity you have given me. I was so honored when I found out I received this scholarship. To be honest before I began writing my essay, I knew very little about the Vietnam war. It isn’t one that is discussed often in history class. But through researching and interviewing my grandfather, I was appalled at my findings. I was completely unaware and oblivious to how these honorable and respectable soldiers were treated. Attending this memorial day event, was the first time I have ever been to one. It was very moving and I am so thankful I got to be a part of it. I also want to thank all the veterans who have sacrificed and selflessly laid down their lives for this country.

I think this is a wonderful opportunity to educate the post Vietnam generations about what actually happened. I know that I have learned a lot, and have definitely earned a lot of respect for those who served during this time. Again, I want to thank everyone who made this scholarship possible for me, it has helped in more ways than you know.

Sincerely,

Hannah Wallace

Carlton, MN

When I think of a veteran the first words that come to mind is a heroic, selfless, brave-hearted, and noble American. I have always had great respect for the men and women that lay down their life for our country. It takes a special kind of person to do that. My grandpa is one of those heroic and noble Americans who served this country in the Vietnam war. In my eyes my grandpa is a hero for what he did, but sadly at his time he was viewed as anything but. When I asked my grandpa how he felt returning home from Vietnam he said, “I wouldn’t even wear my uniform in public, we were as equivalent to dirt under the American people’s feet.” That broke my heart hearing that. Soldiers returning home from war should be welcomed home with longing hearts, open arms, and victorious and triumphant celebrations. But sadly the Vietnam soldiers returning home were greeted with angry protestors, who called them things such as baby killers, psychos, war mongers, and drug addicts.

He told me that the Vietnam war wasn’t even a war, it was a police action. They were helping the south Vietnamese fight the north, we were fighting as allies. But we withdrew after the Tet offensive and huge demand of the enraged Americans. Nixon put into action Vietnamization, and we lost the “war.” This was devastating and disgusting to the American people, because it is commonly considered the first war that the United States ever lost. But I found by researching, that it had a lot to do with how the media was portraying the war. This took place before the news was censored, so when the American people did see a glimpse of the war, all they saw was gruesome killing.

I asked my grandma what is was like having her soldier overseas. She said that, “The war was rarely on the news, and that was scary for a newlywed or wife or any family, not knowing what is happening to your solider.” She told me that when there was news about it, it was just news of protestors or horrifying battle footage. I feel that with the unfair media footage being presented to the Americans, might I add that were not fighting, made these soldiers lose the respect that they

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Thank you to everyone who made this award possible, but more importantly
thank you to those who served our country those
who aren’t with us anymore and
those who are still here today. I want to give a special thank you to my grandfather’s,
I’m glad to have you in my life!

Vietnam War Essay
Kiiera Anderson
I am grateful to have all three of my grandfather’s as Veterans that served during
the Vietnam War, and I am also honored to be an American living in this country. I am,
however, sad to admit that I am witness to our country’s media now, as a 17 year old,
and would not have been proud during the Vietnam War either.
I’m very fortunate to be able to talk to two of my Grandfather’s about their time in
the service. It truly saddens me to hear first hand how the media not only covered the
Vietnam War, but how it changed and shaped the opinions of so many Americans.
One of my grandfathers mentioned that, “They lied about what went on there.
The papers downplayed
the war and made the soldiers out to be murderers.” I cannot
imagine coming home and feeling like the enemy in your own country. He received a
Vietnam Service of Medal with a Bronze Star and a Combat Action Ribbon, awards that
should have been received with honor and praise. My other two Grandfathers didn’t
see combat duty, but they too were blamed for the war. None of them were received in
a high regard.
The media gives quick coverage, but the type of coverage is chosen by who? I
believe that Americans and others became influenced heavily by the portrayal of war in
the media. The media altered their stories, omitted the “good” things our troops were
doing, and only shared misleading and biased information. By keeping facts away from
the people, they spread the need for peace and the war to be over by only showing the
“ugliness” that all war contains.
I can’t help but to think about how media today is playing a role in our
Presidential race. Opinions are being shaped by media propaganda, both true and
false. It is challenging to decipher between the truth and the lies that are being thrown
on TV and all over social media. Being that I am a teenager, I am exposed to this more
than any other age group.
My Grandmother’s shared as well, as they were the ones viewing the media and
how it was causing unrest in our own country. Pictures of United States casualties
flooded media. Pictures of children starving, dirty, and alone were shown to tug at the
heartstrings of America. “Photos of wounded American soldiers were a constant,”
shared my Grandmother. This caused more and more people to want the war over.
“The protesters didn’t help our soldiers at all,“ shared another Grandma. A war was
now breaking out on American soil. Protesters held signs that boycotted the war. Signs
read things like, “Bring our Boys Home,” and “Peace, Not War.”
Media has proven to be disastrous especially
in times of war. It may depend on
who you ask, but I believe the United States won the Vietnam War, it was the media
that “lost” it for us. My Grandfathers served this country proud, and I am lucky to call
them “Grandpa.”